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Posts Tagged ‘private cloud


1. Private cloud deployment is fast and furious.

There has been a rapid rise in private cloud adoption among large enterprises. This isn’t really a surprise as there are a fairly robust set of infrastructures and applications that enterprise IT staff manage and they want to take advantage of the tools and technologies available in the private cloud space – such as multi-tenancy, service automation and self-service portals. Companies are moving past traditional San Diego Colocation, Phoenix Colocation and Los Angeles Colocation. IT staffs think in terms of three core capabilities or “services stacks” that cloud computing can provide their organizations: Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS), Platform as a Service (PaaS) and the familiar Software as a Service (SaaS). Private Clouds provide a framework to streamline the delivery of these IT services to internal customers, enabling business agility while reducing cost.

2.      The hybrid cloud is here to stay.

Across all sectors in both large and mid-size enterprises, it’s clear that the hybrid cloud computing model – linking an internal, premises-based private cloud with the capabilities and bandwidth of public clouds – is here to stay. Companies are looking at application stratification when making decisions. Certain types of CRM, collaboration and messaging applications are seen as appropriate for public clouds, while applications with more sensitive or private information – such as those with industry or government compliance requirements – are being architected to reside within private infrastructures or application spaces that exist within the four walls of the enterprise. “We can appreciate that separation and the reasons for it,” Doscher says. “The Enteracloud Enterprise Cloud Platform offers a shared, multi-tenancy environment that enables us to consult and build a roadmap for our customers. We leverage ITSM and business processes to allow customers to take their existing private cloud infrastructure and build a blueprint that addresses application cloud awareness, connectivity, and security in building one’s hybrid cloud strategy.”

3.      Consolidation is inevitable.

Every technology and industry has gone through cycles of consolidation and while the trend isn’t new, it seems to be one that is gaining traction in the cloud. Customers are seeking to deploy applications in different ways creating demand for consolidation of the cloud delivery models – IaaS, PaaS and SaaS – in the form of a unified stack as a service delivery model. This may be a harbinger of consolidation of cloud service providers as well, in order to provide greater economies of scale to customers. Today a provider may be focused on infrastructure, but with no linkage to the applications. Or a provider may be focused on software, but with no capabilities to manage their cloud-based infrastructure. There is a customer requirement for these capabilities going forward and an effort needs to be made to consolidate infrastructure and platform, bridging these two areas where integration makes the most sense. Doing so allows customers to take advantage of an elastic infrastructure with platform hooks for building and running custom applications.

4.      Application-specific cloud communities are forming.

In public space in particular, discussions around application-specific cloud communities are on the rise, particularly so in three central areas:

 

  • Application Performance Communities
  • Regulatory Communities
  • Location-Based Services Communities

5.      Managed Services get a cloud twist.

Cloud computing has refueled interest in “outsourcing” tasks and organizations are again looking to managed services as they reassess their resource strategies. They are not focused on the ability to utilize a virtual machine, but are focused on the management of infrastructure and taking advantage of the services that cloud computing offers. So, the cloud has become the trigger for discussion and a renewed interest and demand for managed services.


  • Cloud computing will be a key driver of net new IT spending over the next five years as public cloud service providers and the adopters of private cloud environments invest in the supporting infrastructure.
  • According to a new report from International Data Corporation (IDC), ‘Worldwide Enterprise Storage for Public and Private Cloud 2011-2015 Forecast: Enabling Public Cloud Service Providers and Private Clouds’, overall spending by public cloud service providers on storage hardware, software, and professional services will grow at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 23.6 per cent from 2010 to 2015.
  • While enterprise spending on storage for the private cloud will experience a CAGR of 28.9 per cent. By 2015, combined spending for public and private cloud storage will be $22.6 billion worldwide.
  • Despite current economic uncertainties, IDC expects cloud service providers — both public and private — to be among the most expansive spenders on IT products and services as they continue to build out their facilities worldwide and expand their service options,” said Richard Villars, vice president, Storage Systems & Executive Strategies, IDC.
  • The most significant driver of storage consumption over the past three years has been the emergence of public cloud-based application and infrastructure providers. Many of these cloud-based service providers (e.g., iTunes, Netflix, YouTube, Facebook) act as content depots, which are primarily in the business of gathering, organizing, and providing access to large quantities of digital content.
  • Meanwhile, other cloud-based service providers have emerged with a focus on delivering IT infrastructure and applications in an “as a service” model (e.g., salesforce.com, WebEx Connect, Amazon Web Services, etc.). Over the past several years, these companies have undertaken massive storage build-outs as they have expanded their service offerings, entered new markets, and extended their geographic reach.
  • Enabling more efficient delivery of information/applications to Internet-based customers
    • Reducing upfront infrastructure investment levels (i.e., cutting the cost and time associated with deploying new IT and compute infrastructure)
    • Minimizing internal IT infrastructure investment associated with “bursty” or unpredictable workloads
    • Lowering and/or distributing the ongoing costs associated with long-term archiving of information
    • Enabling near-continuous, real-time analysis of large volumes and wide varieties of customer-, partner-, and machine-generated data (Big Data)

Here are four questions, which include key metrics and drivers, to ask when researching cloud solutions that will maximize the value of cloud computing for your organization:

 

1. Why is investment being spent on areas of IT that are not differentiating your business and can be commoditized?

  • Key Metric: The balance of percent of investment on non-core commodity IT
  • Key drivers: TCO needs to consider where to focus IT investment

 

2. How can IT grow and adapt with the ever-increasing expansion of data storage and the growth of computing demands eclipsing on-premise facilities?

  • Key Metric: The cost of storage and archiving , recovery and continuity
  • Key drivers: Latency of network and storage costs can be targeted through considering the whole IT portfolio, not just niche use cases of cost performance. Look at the bigger picture.

 

3. How can access to new markets and new channels be better served through extending networks and partnerships?

  • Key Metric: Size of markets and effectiveness of sales channels, both internal sales and external direct sales and reselling
  • Key drivers: Total cost of acquisition can include the creation or use of third-party distributed marketplaces and self-service portals and platforms

 

4. Is your own IT fast enough to beat your competition or drive the cost savings or revenue and margin growth plans you need?

  • Key metric: Speed of IT delivery and its cost and quality of service.
  • Key drivers: Performance can be offered through selected service provisioning. Question whether all knowledge needs to be in-house. Skills can be as-a-service too.

 read more at zdnet


  • Technology giant IBM launched a set of cloud computing tools designed to help business partners adopt cloud business models and generate new revenue streams by offering public, private and hybrid cloud infrastructures, applications and services to their clients. The company is extending the IBM SmartCloud portfolio with two new public cloud services, SmartCloud Enterprise+ and SmartCloud Application Services.
  • SmartCloud Enterprise+ will provide infrastructure as a service, including enterprise-class governance, administration and management control, multiple security and isolation options built into the virtual infrastructure and network, and real business-centric service-level agreements (SLAs). Additionally, IBM intends to make SCE+ available to qualified IBM business partners for resell in the first half of 2012.
  • SmartCloud Application Services will enable enterprise applications as a cloud service using a set of secure tools, and interested ISVs can join the SmartCloud Application Service beta program.
  • IBM also announced enhancements to the existing IBM SmartCloud, including a white label option for business partners to launch branded services based on SmartCloud Enterprise.
  • In addition, IBM is launching SmartCloud Foundation, a family of private cloud solutions to help businesses design and deploy private cloud environments. The private cloud offerings will be specifically targeted to small to medium-size businesses (SMBs). SmartCloud Entry, delivered by IBM Starter Kit for Cloud, offers the building blocks to create private clouds on virtualized IBM System x and Power Systems hardware.


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